Life lessons, love and learning about publishing at next author reading

1204 ct 01 author re.CT.jpg jpg, CT

Share Adjust Comment Print

It’s a one-two punch (in a good way) at the upcoming session of the ongoing author reading series at the Cochrane Public Library.

Cape Breton writer Ian Glasgow will be by to meet locals and chat about Guardian at the Gate: Lessons from a Cape Breton Childhood.

“The best lessons in my life happened on the Farm where my Mother was raised,” said Glasgow.

“Once the Farm faded to memory, I came to understand that real life happened in ordinary times, not in the big gambles along the way marked with risk, reward, success, and failure.”

Spending his childhood at this maritime farm, the writer learned the value of rolling with the punches.

“Success never turned out to be as sweet as I imagined nor failure as devastating,” he said.

“They were just endings. The best of times came disguised as ordinary times where the focus was on doing everyday things the best way I could.”

The title is currently available at Amazon.ca, and will also be available for purchase at the reading.

“This story about growing older makes it clear that as we age the distance between right and wrong becomes smaller,” Glasgow said.

“Somewhere in the course of telling this story I realized I had never left the farm. I had stored its memories in my heart. The values I learned on the farm I stored even deeper and made them my very own.”

Along with Glasgow will be David Millar, owner of Glasgow’s publisher Melting Tundra. He’ll follow the fun anecdotes and life lessons of Glasgow with a look into the “benefits and pitfalls of self-publishing”. The author of two non-ficiton titles and 80 magazine pieces had been employed as editor of a science magazine.

Light refreshments will be served at the event, which runs at the Cochrane Public Library (405 Railway St W) on December 5 from 6:30-7:30 p.m..

The talk is free, but registration is required. It can be done at CochranePublicLibrary.ca or by calling 403-932-4353.

“While this is a short book it does delve into things like death, aging, and the nonsense most of us endure in our working lives,” said Glasgow.

Guardian at the Gate tries with a healthy dose of humour, to make sense out of all those things.

Comments